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Method Homes Press Room

29

Jul
2012

In Press

By methodhj

Lotus Magazine

On 29, Jul 2012 | In Press | By methodhj

With an ever-growing group of notable architects and forward-thinking designers engaging with the genre like never before, so-called “prefab” houses have moved out of the trailer park and into the limelight.

(Featured Spring 2012 Issue 5)

25

Jul
2012

In Press

By methodhj

Mashable

On 25, Jul 2012 | In Press | By methodhj

Prefabrication isn’t new. In fact, most everything around you is prefab: that picture frame on your desk, your computer monitor, even the light bulb above your head. Prefab simply means an item or components of an item are pre-assembled in a factory before the final product reaches you.

Even prefab homes have been around for decades. The mobile home revolutionized functional, affordable housing. For its time, modular housing was incredibly waste-efficient, too, compared to the on-site building processes of today, which can exhaust more than 30% of building materials.

Rather than overload our landfills, however, contemporary architectural firms and design companies are rethinking what prefab means for today’s waste-conscious and energy-savvy homebuyers. Many are combining traditional modular concepts with a customized approach, allowing clients to select a basic design and alter it according to their tastes.

Read the full article here

06

Jul
2012

In Press

By methodhj

Tree Hugger

On 06, Jul 2012 | In Press | By methodhj

In 1962 architect Robert Martin Engelbrecht designed the Home for the Immediate Future for the Panelbild Division of the United States Plywood Corporation. It is a clever design, built in an era when there was a lot of experimentation with new technologies in housing, much of which went nowhere. Now, 50 years later, Preston at Jetson Green shows us the House for the Immediate Future, being built as part of the 50th anniversary of the fair by Habitat for Humanity, and designed by The Miller Hull Partnership. What is most fascinating about this house is the mix of technologies. One of the problems with modular housing is that much of a house is made of simple planes of studs and plywood, which can be built pretty cheaply by relatively unskilled labour. Other parts, like kitchens and baths, require sophisticated 3D components and highly skilled trades.


Read the Full Article Here

05

Jul
2012

In Press

By methodhj

Contemporist

On 05, Jul 2012 | In Press | By methodhj

Pb Elemental and Method Homes have designed a LEED Platinum prefab house in White Rock, BC, Canada.


Read the Full Article Here

05

Jul
2012

In Press

By methodhj

Seattle DJC

On 05, Jul 2012 | In Press | By methodhj

When the 1962 World’s Fair opened at Seattle Center, there were “houses of the future” and other exhibits on display that envisioned a world with unlimited resources.This Sunday, 50 years later, the Seattle-South King County affiliate of Habitat for Humanity will break ground on a house that reflects a world with limited resources, where not everyone has the money or desire to live large. Habitat and a crew of volunteers will spend several months building what they call the House of the Immediate Future. The two-story, 1,400-square-foot sustainable house will have elements that Habitat intends to use in future projects. Firms on the project team are all donating their time: The Miller Hull Partnership, Evergreen Certified, Z-Home, Sellen, Method Homes, Northwest Mechanical, SvR Design Co. and Magnusson Klemencic Associates.


Read the Full Article Here

05

Jul
2012

In Press

By methodhj

Seattle Business Magazine

On 05, Jul 2012 | In Press | By methodhj

Method Homes prefabricates look nothing like the stereotype of a doublewide. Instead, they’re straight out of the pages of an architectural magazine – modernistic, even daring. Many of Method Homes’ projects are cabins (hardly rustic in design) for remote locations, but it has also done homes for in-city sites. Method Homes builds its modular components in Ferndale. Constructing them indoors cuts down on mold, other contaminants and work that might otherwise be rushed in bad weather. The result is a sturdier, healthier custom home built in a third the time, and with less than 10 percent waste in materials (versus more than 30 percent with some site-built homes). The components are delivered to the site 80 to 95 percent complete and can then be lifted by crane onto their foundations. It’s a formula that seems to be working. In the midst of a brutal housing recession, Method saw its revenue jump from $1.1 million in 2010 to more than $4.6 million in 2011. The company added two new product lines in 2011, boosting its total to six. It also offers custom designs and commercial buildings.


Read the Full Article Here

27

Jun
2012

In Press

By methodhj

Puget Sound Business Journal

On 27, Jun 2012 | In Press | By methodhj

It would be hard to pick a worse time to launch a new home-building business than 2008, but Method Home co-founders Brian Abramson and Mark Rylant survived their firm’s shaky start and are on track to triple company revenue this year.
Seattle-based Method Homes sells modular homes constructed from panels that are pre-built, with electrical wiring, plumbing and fixtures already installed. Neither Abramson, a former commercial real estate broker, or Rylant, a builder, had a background in modular home construction when they started the company. However, they saw opportunity in building modular vacation homes that could be easily assembled on …

Read More ->

30

Jul
2011

In Press

By methodhj

The Washington Post

On 30, Jul 2011 | In Press | By methodhj

By now it’s fair to say most people do not confuse prefab houses with mobile homes. Prefab is simply a different system for building a regular house, of almost any style, producing it in either modules or panels in a factory. With modular houses, there’s a lot of extra engineering involved: After all, at the factory and at the homesite, pieces of the structure have to be picked up by a crane and set in place, first on the delivery rig and then on a concrete foundation — and in between they bounce around for miles on a truck. (Don’t try this with your typical brick colonial.) With panelized construction, sections of walls, complete with innards such as electrical wires, are stacked on trucks, then linked together on site. Look around the Washington area and you’ll see prefabs, except of course you won’t, because when finished they look like regular houses.

Read the full article here

09

Jun
2011

In Press

By methodhj

Dwell on Design

On 09, Jun 2011 | In Press | By methodhj

In 2007, builders and developers Mark Rylant and Brian Abramson launched Method Homes, a prefabricated building company with a focus on modern homes. Since then, the Seattle-based business has taken off and the company has partnered with several architecture firms to complete over 20 residential projects. Rylant will join us at Dwell on Design in Los Angeles June 24-26 for two panels about prefab. Here he gives us an update on Method Homes, the reasons why he went prefab, and a taste of what’s to come at Dwell on Design.

Read the full article here

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